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PERCEIVED INFLUENCE OF BROKEN HOME ON SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS’ ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

ABSTRACT

The study investigated the perceived influence of a broken home on the academic achievement of senior secondary school students in the Jalingo Educational Zone,” with implications for counselling, using a case study of public and private secondary schools in Taraba State’s Jalingo Local Government Area. The survey design and purposive sample approach were used in the research to pick 450 personnel SSS 1-3 level. For data collection from respondents, a well-designed questionnaire that was rated valid and trustworthy was employed. Pearson correlation analysis was used to analyse the data collected from the questionnaire administration. The findings revealed a favourable and statistically significant association between educational difficulties and academic success (r=0.772; p0.05). Male and female pupils’ academic success (r=.896; p0.05). The academic success of urban and rural kids (r=0.772; p0.05).

 

The academic success of kids in private and public schools (r=.896; p0.05). The research revealed that the “perceived effect of broken family on the academic success of senior secondary school pupils in Jalingo Educational Zone” implications for counselling were significant. According to the study, parents should consider the implications of broken homes, particularly divorce, in areas of social and emotional adjustment in schools; families should understand the damage of partner separation on children and look for palliatives that would help in the healthy social and emotional development of children, and family therapy should be sought for assistance in avoiding some cases of broken homes. As a result, family counselling should be used to intervene in family crises; the government should review the law on child abuse from its current level to a reasonable and substantial level in order to improve the lives of all children from broken homes in the country, and employment opportunities for unemployed separated parents should be created so that both parents can monitor the child’s growing attitude and satisfaction.

INTRODUCTION TO CHAPTER ONE 1.1

Introduction to the Research A home is described as a place of residence, habitation, a house, a flat, or any other physical accommodation in which a person lives with his or her family. A home is also a location where a youngster is raised by his or her parents or guardians. A home, in another sense, is a residential place where a person gets domestic love from his or her family members. A family, on the other hand, is defined as a group of individuals who live together under the same roof and are linked by the genetic tie, blood, marriage, law, tradition, adoption, or mutual agreement (Hornby and Parnwell, 2003). (2012). The family is the most fundamental unit of society, providing the necessary psychological, moral, emotional, educational, and spiritual support for a child’s total growth and development.

A family is either intact/unbroken or broken. When both parents fulfil their responsibilities to the kid, the youngster will be well-behaved and emotionally stable. Since the child’s birth, his parents have been the primary socialising agents in his life. Before the kid begins school, the family establishes the educational foundation, and his personality is shaped by his experiences at home. Both parents have important responsibilities to play in their child’s education. According to Yara (2010), academic success may be influenced by a variety of circumstances, but the importance of family relationships in a child’s academic accomplishment and growth cannot be overstated. According to Salami (1998), the father is required to provide the necessary financial resources for the child’s scholastic growth, while the mother is expected to support the father’s efforts toward these goals. When either the father or mother is gone and is unable to supply the fundamental necessities of the kid, including supervision of his academic activities, the youngster will not do creditably well in his studies.

 

When a child’s parents are pleased, he does better. A broken household is one that is fundamentally deficient as a result of divorce, separation, the death of one of the parents, illegitimacy, or irreconcilable disputes. According to Akomolafe et al, (2011), a broken household is one in which both the father and the mother do not live together owing to unresolved disagreements. Life in a broken household is often difficult for both children and parents due to restricted financial resources, restructuring of living routines, and the acceptance of new living patterns. The majority of children from broken households suffer from emotional crises such as despair, frustration, poor self-esteem, and inferiority complexes, among other things (Tonybee, 2008). Students from broken households sometimes struggle to concentrate in class, resulting in low academic performance. Truancy, cultism, bullying, drug misuse, prostitution, stealing, examination malpractice, thuggery, and other maladaptive behaviours are also prevalent among these pupils (Ichado, 2007).

 

Children suffer when families fall apart or become disorganised. They often spend the remainder of their lives dealing with emotional, mental, physical, and intellectual traumas. Most single-parent families may remarry and become two-parent households. As a result of the marriage of both single parents, a new family is formed. Children from each parent’s first marriage become step-siblings in this family, and children from this second marriage are half-siblings to the children from the previous marriage (Uwaifo, 2012; Ebiere & Dorgu, 2014). Problems between non-biological parents and children create tension in a stepfamily; however, this tension is heightened when the children of every single parent live with them as siblings.

 

These types of family environments have been proven to have an impact on children’s academic success. Children might have difficulties as a result of remarriage since they are required to learn and adjust to a new family structure. Younger children may benefit less from a single-parent family (Nzewunah, 2012). Nonetheless, one of the most obvious effects of a broken household on a kid is a rapid fall in scholastic attainment. Academic accomplishment is a student’s objective score on a particular or general educational assignment (Salami, 1998; Tenibaje, 2011).

 

There is no widely accepted indication for assessing students’ academic accomplishment throughout the world, however, a student’s academic achievement in Nigeria is measured by his level of performance in class work, assignments, and internal and external exams. Many variables influence academic success, but the significance of familial relationships on a kid cannot be overstated. The home’s tension, strife, hatred, and instability create a hostile emotional sanctuary. If not handled swiftly, it may lead to tension, animosity, and friction between parents and children, leading to shattered households (Yara, 2010; Tenibaje, 2011).

 

The sluggish progression of these issues presents itself by interfering with the focus and learning skills of these youngsters in school. As a result, a child’s home structure has a significant impact on his success, particularly throughout adolescence. The impact of a broken family on a child’s accomplishment may be seen through the lens of gender and region. Gender is a collection of sociocultural phenomena that categorises individuals as either male or female, with each sex having its own set of duties, features, and stereotypes (Webster’s Dictionary). Both male and female children are likely to be affected by the impact of a broken household on their academic attainment. Aside from gender, geography influences a broken student’s academic performance. Children from broken households who live in cities fare better than their rural counterparts. When children witness their parents living happily together, they are more likely to get along with their siblings, friends, classmates, teachers, and others.

 

They will look forward to going to school and participating actively in class activities. Thus, happy households are required to produce happy children, and happy children are required to achieve superior academic accomplishments in students. 1.2 Statement of the Problem Broken families are presently the fastest-increasing kind of family structure in Nigeria. Despite the government’s, religious institutions, traditional institutions, non-governmental organisations, and marriage counsellors’ efforts to promote marital stability and fidelity among couples/families in Nigeria in general and Taraba state in particular, no robust results have been obtained. Students from broken households face emotional difficulties such as frustration, despair, and demotivation, as well as a lack of emotional support, poor self-esteem, and self-concept.

 

Furthermore, these kids exhibit maladaptive behaviours such as cultism, stealing, thuggery, test cheating, drug misuse, prostitution, and so on. All of these factors contribute to pupils’ low academic performance. Academic accomplishment among students in the Jalingo Educational Zone may be attributed to broken households. As a result, the research attempts to experimentally investigate the perceived effect of broken households on the academic success of senior secondary pupils in Taraba state’s Jalingo educational zone. 1.3 The Study’s Objective The study’s major goal is to investigate the perceived impact of broken households on the academic success of senior secondary pupils in Taraba state’s Jalingo educational zone.

 

The research is designed to fulfil the following particular goals in order to meet the stated primary aim. i. Determine the educational hurdles that kids from broken households encounter. ii. Determine if gender influences the academic success of kids from broken households. iii. To determine if the academic results of kids from broken households are impacted by their location. iii. To determine if the academic success of kids from broken households is impacted by school type. v. To ascertain the consequences of results for counselling. 1.4 Research Suggestions Based on the aforementioned goals, the study’s issues of interest include i. What are the educational problems experienced by pupils from broken households in Taraba State’s Jalingo educational zone? Is gender a factor in the academic accomplishments of kids from broken homes? Is geography a factor in the academic accomplishments of kids from broken homes? Is school type a factor in the academic performance of kids from broken homes? What are the counselling implications of the findings? 1.5

 

Hypotheses for Research The study develops four (4) hypotheses in accordance with each research aim. H01: Educational obstacles have no substantial influence on the academic success of kids from broken homes in the Jalingo educational zone. H02: There is no statistically significant difference in academic success between male and female pupils from broken households in the Jalingo educational zone. H03: There is no statistically significant difference in academic success between kids from broken families attending school in urban and rural parts of the Jalingo educational zone. H04: There is no statistically significant difference in academic success between kids from broken homes who attend private and public schools in the Jalingo educational zone. 1.6 Importance of the Research i. The study’s results will be very beneficial to students, instructors, policymakers, marital counsellors, and future researchers. ii. Teachers will be provided with enough knowledge on how to manage, assist, encourage, inspire, and guide kids from broken families to academic success. iii. Policymakers and curriculum developers will guarantee that effective policies aimed at improving academic success in kids from broken homes are enacted and carried out. iv.

 

Marriage counsellors will be better prepared with information and advice strategies to counsel students and parents. v. Future researchers in this field will profit from this research in future research endeavours. 1.7 Scope of the Research is limited to examining the impact of broken households on the academic success of senior secondary pupils in Taraba state’s Jalingo educational zone. Students from broken households are given priority in the specified study area. The research will be confined to senior secondary school students from broken households; however, junior secondary school students, community secondary school students, students from other zones outside the Jalingo Educational Zone, and secondary school students from other states will not be included. The scope of the research will be confined to the 2017/2018 academic year; any extrapolation beyond this would be through extrapolation. 1.8.1 Assumptions Certain assumptions are used in this research, including the following: i. Survey respondents come from broken households. All of the answers given by respondents throughout the questionnaire administration procedure are truthful and correct, based on their own experience(s) in their individual families. 1.9 Terms with Operational Definitions Academic Achievement: The amount to which a student excels in classroom activities, and internal and external exams. Adolescence: The era of physical and psychological development that occurs between childhood and maturity. A broken household is one in which both parents (father and mother) do not live together owing to an unresolved disagreement, the death of one of the parents, adultery, divorce, or separation. A child is a person under the age of adulthood who has not reached the legal age of duty and accountability. Divorce: The legal end of a marriage. A family is a group of individuals who live together because they are connected by blood, marriage, tradition, or law. A child’s home is the location where he or she is/was reared by his or her parents or guardians. Marriage: The legal marriage of two persons of opposing genders who live together as husband and wife. A schoolchild is a young kid who attends school.

The study investigated the perceived influence of a broken home on the academic achievement of senior secondary school students in the Jalingo Educational Zone,” with implications for counselling, using a case study of public and private secondary schools in Taraba State’s Jalingo Local Government Area.

The survey design and purposive sample approach were used in the research to pick 450 personnel SSS 1-3 level. For data collection from respondents, a well-designed questionnaire that was rated valid and trustworthy was employed. The Pearson correlation analysis was used to assess the data collected from the questionnaire administration.

The findings revealed a favourable and statistically significant association between educational difficulties and academic success (r=0.772; p0.05). Male and female pupils’ academic success (r=.896; p0.05). The academic success of urban and rural kids (r=0.772; p0.05). The academic success of kids in private and public schools (r=.896; p0.05).

The research revealed that the “perceived effect of broken family on academic success of senior secondary school pupils in Jalingo Educational Zone” implications for counselling were significant.

According to the study, parents should consider the implications of broken homes, particularly divorce, in areas of social and emotional adjustment in schools; families should understand the impact of partner separation on children and look for palliatives that would aid in the healthy social and emotional development of children; To avert certain situations of fractured houses, family counselling should be pursued. As a result, family therapy should be employed to intervene in family difficulties. The government should revise the law on child abuse from its current level to a reasonable and substantial level in order to improve the lives of all children in the country who come from broken homes. Employment options for jobless separated parents should be developed so that both parents may watch their child’s developing attitude and contentment.

1.1 Introduction to the Research

A home is described as a place of residence, habitation, a house, a flat, or any other physical accommodation in which a person lives with his or her family. A home is also a location where a youngster is raised by his or her parents or guardians. A home, in another sense, is a residential place where a person gets domestic love from his or her family members. A family, on the other hand, is defined as a group of individuals who live together under the same roof and are linked by the genetic tie, blood, marriage, law, tradition, adoption, or mutual agreement (Hornby and Parnwell, 2003). (2012). The family is the most fundamental unit of society, providing the necessary psychological, moral, emotional, educational, and spiritual support for a child’s total growth and development.

A family is either intact/unbroken or broken. When both parents fulfil their responsibilities to the kid, the youngster will be well-behaved and emotionally stable. Since the child’s birth, his parents have been the primary socialising agents in his life. Before the kid begins school, the family establishes the educational foundation, and his personality is shaped by his experiences at home. Both parents have important responsibilities to play in their child’s education. According to Yara (2010), academic success may be influenced by a variety of circumstances, but the importance of family relationships in a child’s academic accomplishment and growth cannot be overstated. According to Salami (1998), the father is required to provide the necessary financial resources for the child’s scholastic growth, while the mother is expected to support the father’s efforts toward these goals. When either the father or mother is gone and is unable to supply the fundamental necessities of the kid, including supervision of his academic activities, the youngster will not do creditably well in his studies. When a child’s parents are pleased, he does better.

A broken household is one that is fundamentally deficient as a result of divorce, separation, the death of one of the parents, illegitimacy, or irreconcilable disputes. According to Akomolafe et al, (2011), a broken household is one in which both the father and the mother do not live together owing to unresolved disagreements. Life in a broken household is often difficult for both children and parents due to restricted financial resources, restructuring of living routines, and the acceptance of new living patterns. The majority of children from broken households suffer from emotional crises such as despair, frustration, poor self-esteem, and inferiority complexes, among other things (Tonybee, 2008). Students from broken households sometimes struggle to concentrate in class, resulting in low academic performance. Truancy, cultism, bullying, drug misuse, prostitution, stealing, examination malpractice, thuggery, and other maladaptive behaviours are also prevalent among these pupils (Ichado, 2007).

Children suffer when families fall apart or become disorganised. They often spend the remainder of their lives dealing with emotional, mental, physical, and intellectual traumas. Most single-parent families may remarry and become two-parent households. As a result of the marriage of both single parents, a new family is formed. Children from each parent’s first marriage become step-siblings in this family, and children from this second marriage are half-siblings to the children from the previous marriage (Uwaifo, 2012; Ebiere & Dorgu, 2014). Problems between non-biological parents and children create tension in a stepfamily; however, this tension is heightened when the children of every single parent live with them as siblings. These types of family environments have been proven to have an impact on children’s academic success. Children might have difficulties as a result of remarriage since they are required to learn and adjust to a new family structure. Younger children may benefit less from a single-parent family (Nzewunah, 2012). Nonetheless, one of the most obvious effects of a broken household on a kid is a rapid fall in scholastic attainment.

Academic accomplishment is a student’s objective score on a particular or general educational assignment (Salami, 1998; Tenibaje, 2011). There is no widely accepted indication for assessing students’ academic accomplishment throughout the world, however, a student’s academic achievement in Nigeria is measured by his level of performance in class work, assignments, and internal and external exams. Many variables influence academic success, but the significance of familial relationships on a kid cannot be overstated. The home’s tension, strife, hatred, and instability create a hostile emotional sanctuary. If not handled swiftly, it may lead to tension, animosity, and friction between parents and children, leading to shattered households (Yara, 2010; Tenibaje, 2011). The sluggish progression of these issues presents itself by interfering with the focus and learning skills of these youngsters in school. As a result, a child’s home structure has a significant impact on his success, particularly throughout adolescence.

The impact of a broken family on a child’s accomplishment may be seen through the lens of gender and region. Gender is a collection of sociocultural phenomena that categorises individuals as either male or female, with each sex having its own set of duties, features, and stereotypes (Webster’s Dictionary). Both male and female children are likely to be affected by the impact of a broken household on their academic attainment. Aside from gender, geography influences a broken student’s academic performance. Children from broken households who live in cities fare better than their rural counterparts. When children witness their parents living happily together, they are more likely to get along with their siblings, friends, classmates, teachers, and others. They will look forward to going to school and participating actively in class activities. Thus, happy households are required to produce happy children, and happy children are required to achieve superior academic accomplishments in students.

1.2 Statement of the Problem

Broken families are presently the fastest-increasing kind of family structure in Nigeria. Despite the government’s, religious institutions, traditional institutions, non-governmental organisations, and marriage counsellors’ efforts to promote marital stability and fidelity among couples/families in Nigeria in general and Taraba state in particular, no robust results have been obtained. Students from broken households face emotional difficulties such as frustration, despair, and demotivation, as well as a lack of emotional support, poor self-esteem, and self-concept. Furthermore, these kids exhibit maladaptive behaviours such as cultism, stealing, thuggery, test cheating, drug misuse, prostitution, and so on. All of these factors contribute to pupils’ low academic performance. Academic accomplishment among students in the Jalingo Educational Zone may be attributed to broken households. As a result, the research attempts to experimentally investigate the perceived effect of broken households on the academic success of senior secondary pupils in Taraba state’s Jalingo educational zone.

1.3 The Study’s Objective

The study’s major goal is to investigate the perceived impact of broken households on the academic success of senior secondary pupils in Taraba state’s Jalingo educational zone.

The research is designed to fulfil the following particular goals in order to meet the stated primary aim. i. Determine the educational hurdles that kids from broken households encounter. ii. Determine if gender influences the academic success of kids from broken households. iii. To determine if the academic results of kids from broken households are impacted by their location. iii. To determine if the academic success of kids from broken households is impacted by school type. v. To ascertain the consequences of results for counselling.

1.4 Research Suggestions

The following are the study’s questions of interest, based on the stated objectives: i. What are the educational problems encountered by pupils from broken households in Taraba State’s Jalingo educational zone?

1.5 Hypotheses for Research

The study develops four (4) hypotheses in accordance with each research aim.

H01: Educational obstacles have no substantial influence on the academic success of kids from broken homes in the Jalingo educational zone.

H02: There is no statistically significant difference in academic success between male and female pupils from broken households in the Jalingo educational zone.

H03: There is no statistically significant difference in academic success between kids from broken families attending school in urban and rural parts of the Jalingo educational zone.

H04: There is no statistically significant difference in academic success between kids from broken homes who attend private and public schools in the Jalingo educational zone.

1.6 Importance of the Research i. The study’s results will be very beneficial to students, instructors, policymakers, marital counsellors, and future researchers. ii. Teachers will be provided with enough knowledge on how to manage, assist, encourage, inspire, and guide kids from broken families to academic success. iii. Policymakers and curriculum developers will guarantee that effective policies aimed at improving academic success in kids from broken homes are enacted and carried out. iv. Marriage counsellors will be better prepared with information and advice strategies to counsel students and parents. v. Future researchers in this field will profit from this research in future research endeavours.

1.7 Scope of the Research

The research is limited to examining the impact of broken households on the academic success of senior secondary pupils in Taraba state’s Jalingo educational zone. Students from broken households are given priority in the specified study area. The research will be confined to senior secondary school students from broken households; however, junior secondary school students, community secondary school students, students from other zones outside the Jalingo Educational Zone, and secondary school students from other states will not be included. The scope of the research will be confined to the 2017/2018 academic year; any extrapolation beyond this would be through extrapolation.

1.8.1 Assumptions

The following assumptions are used in this study: i. Those who took part in the survey were from shattered households.

1.9 Terms with Operational Definitions

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